Friday 02 February 2018
02 / 02 / 2018

UK Women in IT Awards show diversity campaign is reaching tipping point

Baroness Martha Lane Fox set the tone for this year’s Women in IT Awards with a rousing speech on why tech has to embrace the power and value of diversity at the world’s largest event dedicated to closing the gender gap in the technology industry.

“Unless we are using all of the talents in a sector, that is one of the most rapidly growing in our country, I don’t believe we have a chance of being as successful as if we continue on the path we are at the moment,” she warned.

“Diversity of thought leads to better products and services, more relevant solutions, a more empowered workforce and a better society. It is so important.”

With the Secretary of State for Digital and Culture, Rt Hon Matt Hancock, committing all government departments this week to signing the Tech Talent Charter diversity initiative, there is a growing sense that the campaign to end gender bias is gathering unstoppable momentum.

Commenting on a remarkable evening, which brought together 1,200 industry leaders, Informed Solutions CEO Elizabeth Vega said she is very proud to have been a sponsor of the Women in It Awards since it was inaugurated 4 years ago.  Diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace has always been important but never more so than now.

“We’re finally reaching the tipping point,” continues Elizabeth. “Entrenched attitudes and behaviours are being called out and challenged every single day.  This persistence has led to the growing realisation that our industry needs new role models and access to the full extent and potential of the talent that is available.  It’s shameful that only 17 per cent of employees in the UK tech sector are women.

“Closing the gender gap will ultimately make our sector stronger and more able to benefit all of society.  For example, when airbags were first introduced to cars, women and children were disproportionately injured – because airbags were designed by and for men and were only tested on men.  We also know that early speech recognition software struggled to recognise women’s voices – again because it was designed, built and tested by men.  A diverse workforce can better understand and meet the needs of all society.”

Elizabeth Vega presenting the Innovator of the Year Award

With 19 winners presented with awards on the night, Elizabeth added that the growing number and diversity of inspiring role models in tech was encouraging more women to pursue careers in this sector.  Winners at the Women in IT Awards represented women from all walks of life, working for all types and sizes of businesses, and in a wide range of roles within the IT and Digital industry.

“This type of highly prestigious, national event and the gravitas and diversity of the winners is making a big difference.  Women in IT are not going to go away and we want to see more real progress,” she said.“Unless we are using all of the talents in a sector, that is one of the most rapidly growing in our country, I don’t believe we have a chance of being as successful as if we continue on the path we are at the moment,” she warned.

“Diversity of thought leads to better products and services, more relevant solutions, a more empowered workforce and a better society. It is so important.”

With the Secretary of State for Digital and Culture, Rt Hon Matt Hancock, committing all government departments this week to signing the Tech Talent Charter diversity initiative, there is a growing sense that the campaign to end gender bias is gathering unstoppable momentum.

Commenting on a remarkable evening, which brought together 1,200 industry leaders, Informed Solutions CEO Elizabeth Vega said she is very proud to have been a sponsor of the Women in It Awards since it was inaugurated 4 years ago.  Diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace has always been important but never more so than now.

“We’re finally reaching the tipping point,” continues Elizabeth. “Entrenched attitudes and behaviours are being called out and challenged every single day.  This persistence has led to the growing realisation that our industry needs new role models and access to the full extent and potential of the talent that is available.  It’s shameful that only 17 per cent of employees in the UK tech sector are women.

“Closing the gender gap will ultimately make our sector stronger and more able to benefit all of society.  For example, when airbags were first introduced to cars, women and children were disproportionately injured – because airbags were designed by and for men and were only tested on men.  We also know that early speech recognition software struggled to recognise women’s voices – again because it was designed, built and tested by men.  A diverse workforce can better understand and meet the needs of all society.”

With 19 winners presented with awards on the night, Elizabeth added that the growing number and diversity of inspiring role models in tech was encouraging more women to pursue careers in this sector.  Winners at the Women in IT Awards represented women from all walks of life, working for all types and sizes of businesses, and in a wide range of roles within the IT and Digital industry.

“This type of highly prestigious, national event and the gravitas and diversity of the winners is making a big difference.  Women in IT are not going to go away and we want to see more real progress,” she said.“Unless we are using all of the talents in a sector, that is one of the most rapidly growing in our country, I don’t believe we have a chance of being as successful as if we continue on the path we are at the moment,” she warned.

“Diversity of thought leads to better products and services, more relevant solutions, a more empowered workforce and a better society. It is so important.”

With the Secretary of State for Digital and Culture, Rt Hon Matt Hancock, committing all government departments this week to signing the Tech Talent Charter diversity initiative, there is a growing sense that the campaign to end gender bias is gathering unstoppable momentum.

Commenting on a remarkable evening, which brought together 1,200 industry leaders, Informed Solutions CEO Elizabeth Vega said she is very proud to have been a sponsor of the Women in It Awards since it was inaugurated 4 years ago.  Diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace has always been important but never more so than now.

“We’re finally reaching the tipping point,” continues Elizabeth. “Entrenched attitudes and behaviours are being called out and challenged every single day.  This persistence has led to the growing realisation that our industry needs new role models and access to the full extent and potential of the talent that is available.  It’s shameful that only 17 per cent of employees in the UK tech sector are women.

“Closing the gender gap will ultimately make our sector stronger and more able to benefit all of society.  For example, when airbags were first introduced to cars, women and children were disproportionately injured – because airbags were designed by and for men and were only tested on men.  We also know that early speech recognition software struggled to recognise women’s voices – again because it was designed, built and tested by men.  A diverse workforce can better understand and meet the needs of all society.”

With 19 winners presented with awards on the night, Elizabeth added that the growing number and diversity of inspiring role models in tech was encouraging more women to pursue careers in this sector.  Winners at the Women in IT Awards represented women from all walks of life, working for all types and sizes of businesses, and in a wide range of roles within the IT and Digital industry.

“This type of highly prestigious, national event and the gravitas and diversity of the winners is making a big difference.  Women in IT are not going to go away and we want to see more real progress,” she said